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Still Ain’t Satisfied?: The Limit of Differences

The synopsis examines the topics in any curriculum for classes of American Sign Language. To teach American Sign Language matters through the lens of Social Justice is to provide ASL diverse students the open environment to enjoy learning and expressing of their own with others. Also, it creates a classroom environment that fosters social justice education. In the first part of two activities, teachers will assess the principles of social justice education and identify ways that those principles can support their standards, objectives, and targeted language skills in modern ASL education. Through discussion and reflection, teachers will identify their own interests and strengths as language educators for Social Justice. In the second part of two activities, teachers will build on their establishment to adapt, develop and create learning opportunities for ASL students.

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About

Niesha Washington-Shepard

Niesha Washington-Shepard

Niesha graduated from Gallaudet University with a master degree in Sign Language Education. Currently she is working as a faculty for Deaf Studies and American Sign Language (ASL) department at her alma mater. The reason is to give back to the institution that helped shape her into the woman she is today. She does love teaching ASL, Deaf history and culture. Other days she also does many things for my service, such as presenting different topics at conferences and workshops, tutoring for Biology and ASL, video editing, graphic designing for websites, translating in American Sign Language, videotaping and interpreting at schools, hospitals, government, and courts. Her hobbies are to spend time with her family, loves traveling to countries and eats international foods. She is residing in the metro area of DC, VA and MD with her husband Dale and three lovely children, Faith 12, Isaiah 3, and Skyla 1 year old.

Franklin Jones Jr.

Franklin Jones Jr.

Franklin was born and raised on Wadmalaw Island, SC. He’s a fourth-generation deaf person in his family. He graduated from Gallaudet University in 2017 and majored in American Sign Language, with a double-minor in Deaf Studies and Linguistics. He is the first to receive a master’s degree in his deaf family. Currently, he is a faculty member of the ASL/Deaf Studies department at Gallaudet University and teaches ASL as a first language to the deaf. He wants to see deaf students become experts in American Sign Language and maintain an ASL standard. One day, he wants to become a motivational speaker for young black men in the deaf community. His goal is to support them to pursue and continue their education until they graduate high school, or even college and obtain a diploma/degree, and to ensure that they accomplish their dreams, like others.