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Effective Corrective Feedback for Sign Language Learners

Sign language instructors often provide corrective feedback to their students. However, are they aware of the different types of corrective feedback they can have in their arsenal? Do they know what current research says about the effectiveness of each type of corrective feedback? Are they using corrective feedback that helps students recognize their errors and attempt to self-correct? 

There is a plethora of research regarding the use of corrective feedback for spoken languages, which sign language instructors can build upon for examining how they provide feedback to their students. This workshop will provide an overview of the different types of corrective feedback. While all feedback types have benefits, participants will learn about the feedback shown by research to be more effective for helping students to recognize their errors and correct them. Participants will have opportunities to explore the use of corrective feedback to provide feedback to common errors.

About

Brenda Falgier

Brenda Falgier

Brenda is an ASL instructor at Kirkwood Community College at Iowa City campus. She earned her M.A. in Sign Language Education from Gallaudet University, and holds an ASLTA Master certification. She has been in the ASL field for over 20 years. Her professional interests include exploring the application of current research in second language and second modality learning and teaching, using technology to develop innovative instructional materials, and preserving the authenticity of ASL.

Timothy Riker

Timothy Riker

Timothy is a Lecturer of American Sign Language at Brown University, where he teaches a three-year series of ASL and Deaf Studies courses. He is research Co-Investigator at UMass Medical School, working with Melissa Anderson and their research team to engage with the Deaf community to improve their research with Deaf participants. Riker is a second-generation Deaf person, an alumnus from Maryland School for the Deaf, and earned his Masters in Sign Language Education from Gallaudet University. He is also active in the Deaf community, serving as Chairperson of the Rhode Island Commission on the Deaf and Hard of Hearing.

Riker is also presenting on “The Role of Deaf Studies in Transformative Health and Biomedical Research Through Engaged Scholarship”.